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Lactation Innovation: Research Updates from Down Under

Description

Description

Dr. Prime completed her PhD in biochemistry in 2010 at The University of Western Australia
with Professor Peter Hartmann and the Human Lactation Research Group. Her research
included topics such as:

• The impact of temperature and time of heat treatment upon breastmilk and its
bioactive proteins
• The number, timing and pattern of milk ejections in women during milk removal
• The impact of breast anatomy and breastshield size on milk ejection and milk
removal
• The impact on double versus single pumping on milk ejection and milk removal

The focus of Danielle’s research has been centered on understanding more about the basic
physiology of human lactation, to provide clinicians and mothers' evidence based
knowledge.

Duration
3 Hours 15 Minutes
Course ID
1330005E

Credit Hours

  • Nursing - 3.0 Contact Hours
  • Dietitian - 3.0 CPE Credits

Outline

 

Part 1: Breastfeeding: Part Mum, Part Baby, Part Teamwork
This presentation will piece together the current knowledge on breastfeeding from the mother’s perspective (milk ejection, breast anatomy, milk storage and availability) as well as the infant’s perspective (sucking, swallowing, breathing and appetite). In addition, topics relating to the mother and infant interacting as a team will be covered. This interaction will be described in terms of breastfeeding behavior (frequency and patterns) as well as at the effects of skin-to-skin and hormones such as oxytocin.
 
Part 2: Maximizing Milk Production
Tying in with the first part of the presentation, we dig a little deeper into the often forgotten, but crucial component of a successful lactation: the milk ejection reflex. I will describe the latest research that has brought about a new understanding of role of milk ejection in milk removal. In this context, the newest research on the topics of using different sized breastshields and double versus single pumping will be described.