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Human Milk Collection and Storage

Description

Description

This course developed by Jean Rhodes, PhD, CNM, IBCLC highlights issues related to the science and practice of human milk collection and storage. Over the last 30 years, research studies of this topic have examined a multitude of aspects of human milk under varying storage conditions. To highlight the diversity of this body of literature, three articles are reviewed: a laboratory study of the effects of storage on the anti-pathogenic activities of the human milk fat globule membrane; a current clinical protocol for milk storage and handling for healthy term infants; and a study of refrigerator storage of fresh milk in a NICU setting. Themes common to these articles are discussed as well as applications to clinical practice and areas for further study.

Duration
1 Hour 0 Minutes
Course ID
1310002E-1

Credit Hours

  • Nursing - 1.0 Contact Hours
  • Dietitian - 1.0 CPE Credits

Outline

Objectives:

Section 1: Introduction and Discussion of Article 1: Effects of Storage on the Physiochemical and Antibacterial Properties of Human Milk

  • Identify components of human milk often studied in relation to milk collection and storage
  • Discuss the role of the human milk fat globule membrane in reducing the risk of infection in the breastfed infant
  • Discuss the effects of refrigeration on the antibacterial properties of human milk

Section II: Discussion of Article 2: Protocol #8:
Human Milk Storage Information for Home Use for Full-Term Infants

  • Identify several important aspects of preparation for human milk collection and storage and apply to clinical practice
  • Discuss the rationale for ranges of storage duration articulated in this Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine protocol
  • Identify areas for further study as recommended by the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

Section III: Discussion of Article 3: Refrigerator Storage of Expressed Human Milk in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

  • Identify changes in fresh human milk components after 96 hours of refrigeration
  • Compare the effects of refrigeration on fresh milk to those of refrigerated donor milk
  • Discuss clinical practice challenges related to determining when human milk is safe and not safe for infant consumption