Question:

How much milk should I produce?

Answer:

In the past it was thought that mothers needed to make more and more milk as their babies grew.  Scientists now know that a healthy milk supply remains fairly constant over the six (6) months of exclusive breastfeeding.  Your baby will take the amount he needs.

During the early weeks, babies eat very frequently and grow very quickly.  By day 10-14, babies should regain any weight they lost after birth.  For the next few months babies will gain about an ½ ounce to 1 ounce a day. 

Around three (3) to four (4) months, a breastfed baby’s rate of grown begins to slow down.  Your milk supply will continue to satisfy the baby until it is time to introduce solids at 6 months.

Be the end of the first week of life, women who are breastfeeding one baby normally make between 19 to 30 ounces of milk each day.  Infants between one (1) and six (6) months of age normally drink an average of 19 to 30 ounces a day. 

An average size “meal” for a baby is between three (3) to five (5) ounces of breastmilk.  Formula is harder to digest and less well absorbed.  Formula fed babies may need larger feeds.  Consult your healthcare professional for advice.


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